I was due to start another series with the BBC but that didn’t go anywhere, and the other side [ITV] didn’t want to know. I was shunned. They didn’t want to hear the other side. –Botanist David Bellamy in 2013 about reactions to his views on climate change

The simple Politically Correct climate change sequence

By Roger Childs

The enthusiastic supporters of the existence of climate change see the process as a straight forward sequence:

CLIMATE CHANGE  =  HUMAN ACIVITY FROM THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION ON   >   INCREASING AMOUNTS OF  GREENHOUSE GASES PUMPED INTO THE ATMOSHERE   >  ON-GOING RISING TEMPERATURES ON THE PLANET  >  MASSIVE MELTING  OF ICE AT THE POLES  >  INCREASING SEA LEVELS AROUND THE GLOBE  >  MORE EXTREME WEATHER EVENTS  = A MASSIVE THREAT TO LIFE ON EARTH 

Essentially then, the perceived causes of global warming can be laid at the door of the planet’s people. No-one would disagree that the air and water pollution caused by the world’s population should be reduced, however, is climate change really a consequence of human activity? 

Questions to answer

  1. The approximate composition of the atmosphere is not in question – nitrogen 78%, oxygen 21%, argon 0.93% and trace elements of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide 0.04, methane 0.00017%, nitrous oxide 0.00003%. Greenhouse gases help prevent the planet’s temperature from becoming too cold for life to exist, but is it credible that that the less than 0.01% (one thousandth) of the atmosphere is now rapidly heating up planet Earth?
  2. Is carbon dioxide part of the carbon cycle and essential for life on Earth?
  3. Is more carbon dioxide bad for humans, animals and vegetation in the ecosystem?
  4. Has the world experienced warmer and cooler periods (with occasional ice ages) in its long history?
  5. Why did the Earth’s average annual temperature drop year by year from the 1880s to 1939? (In this period there were no pollution controls and it included the second industrial revolution (late 19th–early 20th century) and the First World War.)
  6. In the period 1946-1975 there was a drop in the planet’s average surface temperature in half of the years. Bearing in mind that this was a time of massive industrialization and pollution in Europe, North America and some Asian countries, why did this happen?
  7. In 1980s the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicted that before 2020, many lowland areas like the delta areas of Bangladesh, low-lying islands in the Pacific and Indian Oceans and coastal city fringes like in Wellington and Lower Hutt, would be under water. Why didn’t this happen?
  8. There have been concerns that polar ice around the North Pole has been steadily disappearing. Does this evidence suggest otherwise? “As of October 31, (2021) sea ice extent is tracking higher than any year since 2015, as well as higher than observed in 2007, 2011, and 2012.” US National Snow and Ice Data Center
  9. Seventy years ago there were dire predictions that polar bears were becoming extinct. In 1950 scientists reported the population was about 5000, however recently the World Wildlife Fund estimated that there are now 22,000 – 31,000. How do you account for this?
  10. There is plenty of evidence that the number of extreme weather events fluctuate year by year. They have always happened and there in no proof that they are getting worse. For example in the South Pacific there were more tropical cyclones in the late 1990s than in the 2000s.
  11. Why have many scientists, such as David Bellamy (See the quote at the top), been vilified and sidelined by the media because of their opposition to the politically correct view of climate change?

Could it be that today’s alleged global warming (and there is dispute over that) is just part of a natural cycle of cooling and warming, and that any variations and extreme events are a normal part of the world’s weather patterns?