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Probe into eight 1080 Waikato cattle deaths in 2018 points to DOC breach

From Radio NZ : An investigation in an aerial drop of 1080 that killed eight cattle in the King Country in September 2018 has found that the Department of Conservation breached one of its operating procedures. The DOC pest control operation was conducted over the 1400 ha Mapara Wildlife Reserve, 35 km southeast of Te Kuiti. The livestock got […]

via Probe into eight 1080 Waikato cattle deaths in 2018 points to DOC breach — Rangitikei Environmental Health Watch

Until Police can Stop this Behaviour, LFOs should resist a register

THEAMSHOW-mike-clements-130819-1120-1068x610

from The BFD

The Police have become overbearing and threatening in their dealings with Licenced Firearms Owners. They have been aided and abetted by an out of control Police Minister, Stuart Nash.

Currently, they are ramming through legislation for a gun register despite the fact that no gun register anywhere in the world has been either

A) cost-effective.

B) a useful tool in crime prevention.

On top of that, they have proven that they cannot be trusted with private data after a massive data breach that potentially exposed more than 30,000 LFOs.

Then we have the alarming statistics regarding criminal elements within the Police who are accessing existing databases and selling information to criminals. In a Stuff article this week, we read about a bent copper who spent a year selling database information from Police systems to criminals.

Read the rest


As we have mentioned before, any improper behaviour you may experience by a Police officer should be the subject of an immediate complaint to the Independent Police Conduct Authority — website   In our experience, most police officers are good, but there is definitely a small minority who are not and the IPCA is keen for these to be weeded out.

homicide rates per 100K inhabitants of every country, latest list (alphabetical)

1 Afghanistan 7.1
2 Albania 2.3
3 Algeria 1.4
4 Andorra 0
5 Angola 4.8
6 Antigua and Barbuda 10.3
7 Argentina 5.2
8 Armenia 2.4
9 Australia 0.8
10 Austria 0.7
11 Azerbaijan 2
12 Bahamas 30.9
13 Bahrain 0.5
14 Bangladesh 2.2
15 Barbados 10.5
16 Belarus 3.6
17 Belgium 1.7
18 Belize 37.9
19 Benin 1.1
20 Bhutan 1.6
21 Bolivia 6.3
22 Bosnia and Herzegovina 1.2
23 Botswana NA
24 Brazil 30.5
25 Brunei 1
26 Bulgaria 1.5
27 Burkina Faso 1.3
28 Burundi 6
29 Cabo Verde 11.5
30 Cambodia 1.8
31 Cameroon 1.4
32 Canada 1.8
33 Cayman Islands 8.4
34 Central African Republic 19.8
35 Chad NA
36 Chile 4.3
37 China 0.6
38 Colombia 24.9
39 Comoros NA
40 Congo NA
41 Costa Rica 12.3
42 Cote d’Ivoire NA
43 Croatia 1.1
44 Cuba 5
45 Cyprus 0.6
46 Czechia 0.6
47 Democratic Republic of the Congo NA
48 Denmark 1.2
49 Djibouti NA
50 Dominica 25.7
51 Dominican Republic 11.3
52 Ecuador 5.8
53 Egypt 2.5
54 El Salvador 61.8
55 Equatorial Guinea NA
56 Eritrea NA
57 Estonia 2.2
58 Eswatini 9.5
59 Ethiopia NA
60 Federated States of Micronesia 19.9
61 Fiji 2.3
62 Finland 1.2
63 France 1.3
64 Gabon NA
65 Gambia NA
66 Georgia 1
67 Germany 1
68 Ghana 2.1
69 Greece 0.7
70 Grenada 11.1
71 Guadeloupe 5.1
72 Guatemala 26.1
73 Guinea NA
74 Guinea-Bissau 1.1
75 Guyana 14.8
76 Haiti 9.5
77 Holy See 0
78 Honduras 41.7
79 Hungary 2.5
80 Iceland 0.9
81 India 3.2
82 Indonesia 0.4
83 Iran 2.5
84 Iraq 8.2
85 Ireland 0.9
86 Israel 7.5
87 Italy 2.1
88 Jamaica 57
89 Japan 0.2
90 Jordan 1.4
91 Kazakhstan 5
92 Kenya 5
93 Kiribati 1.8
94 Kosovo 2.1
95 Kuwait 4
96 Kyrgyzstan 4.2
97 Laos 41.2
98 Latvia 4.2
99 Lebanon 3.2
100 Lesotho 41.2
101 Liberia 0
102 Libya NA
103 Liechtenstein 1.7
104 Lithuania 4.5
105 Luxembourg 0.3
106 Madagascar 2.1
107 Malawi 2.6
108 Malaysia 2.1
109 Maldives 0.9
110 Mali NA
111 Malta 0.9
112 Marshall Islands NA
113 Martinique 1.8
114 Mauritania NA
115 Mauritius 1.8
116 Mexico 24.8
117 Monaco 0
118 Mongolia 6.2
119 Montenegro 2.4
120 Morocco 2.1
121 Mozambique 17.1
122 Myanmar 2.3
123 Namibia 2.2
124 Nauru 0
125 Nepal 7.4
126 Netherlands 0.8
127 New Zealand 0.7
128 Nicaragua 7.4
129 Niger 4.4
130 Nigeria NA
131 North Korea NA
132 Norway 0.5
133 Oman 0.5
134 Pakistan 4.2
135 Palau 8.9
136 Panama 9.7
137 Papua New Guinea 0.4
138 Paraguay 0.7
139 Peru 7.7
140 Philippines 8.4
141 Poland 0.8
142 Portugal 0.7
143 Qatar 0.4
144 Moldova 2.5
145 Romania 1.5
146 Russia 9.2
147 Rwanda 34.2
148 Saint Kitts and Nevis 34.2
149 Saint Lucia 29.6
150 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 25.6
151 Samoa 3.1
152 San Marino 0
153 Sao Tome and Principe 12.7
154 Saudi Arabia 1.3
155 Senegal 1.7
156 Serbia 1.1
157 Seychelles 12.7
158 Sierra Leone 1.7
159 Singapore 0.2
160 Slovakia 1.5
161 Slovenia 0.9
162 Solomon Islands 13.9
163 Somalia 0.7
164 South Africa 35.9
165 South Korea 0.6
166 South Sudan 13.9
167 Spain 0.7
168 Sri Lanka 2.3
169 Palestine 0.7
170 Sudan NA
171 Suriname 5.5
172 Sweden 1.1
173 Switzerland 0.5
174 Syria 3.2
175 Taiwan 0.8
176 Tajikistan 3.9
177 Tanzania 6.2
178 Thailand 3.2
179 North Macedonia 1.5
180 Timor-Leste 3.9
181 Togo 1
182 Tokelau 30.9
183 Tonga 3
184 Trinidad and Tobago 4.3
185 Tunisia 3
186 Turkey 5.9
187 Turkmenistan 18.6
188 Tuvalu 9.5
189 Uganda 11
190 Ukraine 6.2
191 United Arab Emirates 0.5
192 United Kingdom 1.2
193 United States of America 5.3
194 Uruguay 8.2
195 Uzbekistan 1.1
196 Vanuatu NA
197 Venezuela 56.3
198 Vietnam 6.5
199 Yemen 6.5
200 Zambia 5.3
201 Zimbabwe 6.7

Kapiti Historical Society — December 2019 Newsletter

In this issue–

  • Feedback on Richard Mansell’s talk last month
  • The forthcoming December session – David Hadfield on his famous ancestor Octavius Hadfield– Tuesday 17 December
  • Possible sessions for 2020

Thanks to our November speaker: Richard Mansell

It was great to have the chief executive along to speak about the evolution of Coastlands over the last 50 years. It has been an amazing on-going development in central Paraparaumu and does great credit to the earlier founders, and Richard and his staff.

He illustrated his highly interesting session with maps and aerial photos showing how the landscape of central Paraparaumu has been transformed in the last 50 years.

The talk was much appreciated by the members.

The December speaker: David Hadfield

Hadfields

Octavius Hadfield was a sickly young man when he arrived in New Zealand as a missionary in the 1830s. He was not expected to survive for long, but extraordinarily he lived to become Archbishop of New Zealand and died at the age of 90.

Octavius and his wife Kate, the daughter of Northland missionary Henry Williams, had a huge impact on the Kapiti area, and being fluent in te reo, they enjoyed excellent relations with local Maori. Over the decades, Octavius Hadfield was a frequent thorn in the side of colonial governments as he was determined to see the native people treated fairly, especially with regards to the sale of land.

Come along and hear his great-great-great grandson, David, talking about his famous ancestor.  It should be a very interesting and informative talk covering the many roles Octavius Hadfield played in Kapiti’s and New Zealand’s history in the mid to late 19th century.

Tuesday, 17 December at 7.30 pm
Kapiti Uniting Church
10 Weka Road, Raumati Beach
Enter via the main church door.
Gold coin koha. Thanks
A light supper will be served following the talk.

2020 – shaping up the programme of topics and speakers

  • Kapiti’s Changing Coastline (Professor Mark Dickson) – confirmed for Tuesday 31 March
  • Gallipoli – Myth and Reality – confirmed for April
  • Whareoa Farm (Ann Evans) – confirmed, probably May
  • Paraparaumu’s First Retirement Village – Seven Oaks
  • The history of Paraparaumu airport
  • Key figures in Kapiti’s early-mid 19th century history – Wiremu Kingi, Te Rauparaha and Octavius Hadfield
  • Suggestions for topics and speakers are always very welcome.

All the very best for the festive season.
Roger Childs and John Robinson, Coordinators of the Kapiti Historical Society

areas of council work being undertaken in Waikanae over the coming weeks

A message from the council.


Waimea Domain boardwalk
The decking of the boardwalk is being replaced. The bridge is not having the decking replaced as the whole bridge will need replacing in a few years and the current surface is adequate. The work will take 2–3 weeks and the track will be closed during working hours but accessible in the evenings and during the weekend.


WaikanaeTrackWorks

Waikanae River trail, north bank
We are resurfacing the Waikanae River trail on El Rancho land between the Expressway footbridge and the Otaihanga Domain Oxbow bridge. Works are expected to take three days and will involve scraping and widening the soft material off the track surface and bringing in new gravel. The track will remain open and will be actively managed around the work site to ensure the safety of users. Work will commence in the next couple of weeks.

For both Waimea Domain and Waikanae River trail there will be signs in place to let people know that this work is being undertaken and we will inform people through our usual channels.


Waimanu Lagoons tidal flushing
Every year during the summer period we flush the Waimanu Lagoons to control the weed and algae (if present).  We will be undertaking the first tidal flush before Christmas (likely the week of 8 December, depending on weather and tides) and three or four  times over the summer period.  The lagoon will be drained, the control gate closed and a low water level maintained for approximately 3 – 5 days depending on dry weather to allow the weed and/or algae to burn off.  A letter will go out to residents near the Lagoons early next week to let them know this is happening.

Waikanae Estuary Care Group gets a DoC grant towards growing some 3500 native plants in the Care Group’s nursery in the estuary

Dept of Conservation media release


waikanae estuary sunset

The Waikanae Estuary Care Group will be stocking up their plant nursery to help restore the Lower North Island’s second most valuable estuarine environment following a $20,000 grant from the Department of Conservation (DOC) Community Fund.

The Waikanae Estuary Scientific Reserve, established in 1987, protects a natural mosaic of freshwater and coastal ecosystems in what is today an urbanised area. The Waikanae Estuary Care Group has been working hard since 2006 to maintain and restore the estuary.

The Care Group will receive $20,000 over the next 21 months from the Community Fund, which will go towards growing of some 3500 native eco-sourced plants in the Care Group’s own nursery in the estuary.

“This grant will support and grow our existing work to improve the Waikanae Estuary for both the flora, fauna and the public,” says Robin Gunston, chairman of the Care Group.

“Increased urbanisation has seen the estuary habitats reduced in area, and they are also subject to an increasing range of pressures about their use. A key part of the Care Group’s work is not only to restore but demonstrate to the public how they can protect and care for the Scientific Reserve that they use regularly, but often take for granted.”

An additional 2000 plants will be specially sourced and grown to go alongside the main estuary path, aimed at radically enhancing the public perception of the Scientific Reserve. The nursery will be updated, with renewed shade house growing and plant-out capacity. Planting will be enhanced by environmentally friendly plant shelters, which are more effective and reusable.

Read the rest