This screens on TV1 on Sunday evening and, like everything produced by the BBC nowadays because of its political bias, caution is required about what you are presented:

The BBC’s new drama The Salisbury Poisonings concluded [in June in the UK]. A three-part story “based on actual events”, claiming to tell the story of the alleged poisoning of Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia in Salisbury in 2018.

It’s exactly what you’d expect. Schlocky tat. Poorly researched, badly written and woefully factually inaccurate.

The Guardian gave it four stars. Because of course they did. Because when you’re dealing with government-backed narrative everything that reinforces it must be described as having value. It’s one of the hallmarks of propaganda, that no story which supports the propaganda – however ridiculous – can ever be questioned, criticised or disputed.

There’s room for an in-depth review, and indeed Craig Murray has done a fine job deconstructing the series. But here, I just want to focus on everything they don’t tell you.

Here are five key facts the BBC simply forgot to mention.

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